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MATCHA


Packed with UPTO 15 times
the antioxidants
of regular green tea
Matcha is marvellously
good for you.

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MATCHA


Packed with UPTO 15 times
the antioxidants
of regular green tea
Matcha is marvellously
good for you.

Organic premium grade CEREMONIAL MATCHA

Matcha is packed with antioxidants and is super good for you as well as tasting great.

Our organic Matcha is grown in Uji, Japan. Many Matcha connoisseurs consider Uji to have the ultimate terroir for Matcha cultivation -  so our Matcha is the real thing. The green tea leaves are shaded, handpicked, dried and then milled by granite stone mills into an ultra-fine powder. Drunk by Zen Buddhist monks and Japanese emperors for over 800 years. 

Matcha is a natural energy booster that slowly releases energy for 4-6 hours, helps stave off hunger and is packed with antioxidants.

Matcha is extremely versatile and can be used as hot tea, mixed with cold or hot water, blended with smoothies and juices, and for baking and food.


Preparation of CEREMONIAL Matcha

To prepare a perfect bowl of Matcha tea you simply need to:

  1. Boil fresh water.

  2. Let the water cool down to 80°C (e.g. open kettle and wait for 10 min or pour the water at least 4-5 times into another cold pot – water loses 4-5° C with each decanting).

  3. Put 1g Matcha (2 bamboo scoops or ½ tea scoop) into the Matcha bowl.

  4. Add up 80ml of hot (80°C) water.

  5. Whisk the tea with a Bamboo Matcha whisker until a fine froth appears.

You can buy a Matcha whisker and spoon from our shop

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How to make a MATCHA LATTE


NIHON MATCHA
- FOR THE BEST MATCHA LATTE

How to make a MATCHA LATTE


NIHON MATCHA
- FOR THE BEST MATCHA LATTE

Matcha Latte

You can make a Matcha latte by mixing the Matcha with hot milk or any plant milk such as soya. Add cane sugar or honey if that's your thing. Simple.

Our food & drink grade organic Matcha is great for mixing with other ingredients such as iced teas, juices and smoothies.

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What is MATCHA


What is MATCHA


Growing and making Matcha

The production of Matcha is without a doubt the most elaborate method of producing tea in the world.

Growing and Harvesting Matcha
Matcha grows only in shadowed tea fields. Four weeks prior to the harvest the tea fields are entirely covered by shades. This special shading technique results into a 90% reduction of sunlight. The plants, now growing almost in the dark, compensate for the lack of light by an intense production of chlorophyll making the leaves richer in amino acids, and resulting in a drink with a sweet and delicately smooth flavour.

The Matcha harvest is at the beginning of May and are picked by hand before being taken to the Aracha factory (Aracha literally translates as “raw tea”). First the leaves are gently steamed which helps stops the fermentation, keeping the leaves fresh and ensuring the nutrients remain in the tea. The leaves are then dried at a temperature of 180°C / 356° F. The temperature and the time allowed for drying depends on the weather conditions.

Selection and blending Matchs
The tea is now taken to a refining company where tea tasters evaluate the colour, taste and texture and categorise the tea leaves. This is followed by a sophisticated and delicate procedure to remove the stems, twigs and unwanted elements so that just the finest and purest parts of the tea plant remain which are then cut in to similar sized pieces and is called Tencha tea.

There are more than 100 existing grades of Matcha, which differ from each other in colour, taste and flavour. Putting different amounts of different leaf grades together to ensure a consistent quality level is called blending. Blending the tea is necessary to achieve different quality levels of Matcha. 

Grinding Matcha
The last step in producing Matcha is where special granite stone mills grind the tea into superfine Matcha powder. This is done in a cleanroom where temperature and humidity are kept constant. Industrial quality filters keep the air clean and eliminate bacteria and germs. The grinding creates an ultra-fine powder that just melts in the mouth. One single stone mill grinds only up to 30-40g tea per hour, even in the 21st century the granite stone mill is still necessary to make Matcha to ensure the tea retains its intense colour and exquisite taste and flavour.